Dual nationality

If you live abroad and you have another nationality besides Dutch nationality, you might need to present extra documents when you apply for a Dutch passport or identity card. You can apply at a Dutch embassy or consulate in your region.

Dual nationality

In most cases you will lose your Dutch nationality if you acquire another nationality. However, if any of the exceptions applies to you, you can keep both nationalities. You can also lose your Dutch nationality if you have dual nationality and you don’t renew your Dutch passport, identity card or certificate of Dutch nationality in time.

Applying for a passport, identity card or certificate of Dutch nationality

If you don’t need a Dutch passport to travel but you would like to keep your Dutch nationality, you can apply for a certificate of Dutch nationality. This is cheaper and you don’t need to apply in person.

You can apply for a passport, identity card or certificate of Dutch nationality at a Dutch embassy or consulate in your region. If you have dual nationality, you may need to provide extra documents.

Renewing an adult passport for the first time

If you have dual nationality and you are renewing your passport for the first time since your 18th birthday, you must prove that at least one of your parents held Dutch nationality until you were 18 years old. You will need to provide the following documents:

  • your parent’s Dutch passport and a valid residence permit for your parent’s country of residence or other documents proving your parent has Dutch nationality
  • an official copy of your birth certificate or an extract from the register of births giving your parents’ full names and your place of birth.

First application since acquiring another nationality

If you are applying for a Dutch passport or identity card for the first time since acquiring another nationality, you must indicate that you have a second nationality on the application form. You must also provide extra documents to prove that one of the exceptions below applies to you and that you still have Dutch nationality. If any of the documents were issued abroad, find out if they need to be legalised. This is often the case for birth certificates, marriage certificates and death certificates.

You were born in the country whose nationality you possess and were living there when you acquired the nationality of that country

  • You must present your naturalisation certificate issued by the country where you live.
  • You must present an official copy of your birth certificate. This document must not be more than a year old. It must state your place of birth and your parents’ full names.
  • You must present proof of residence, for example an electricity bill.

You lived in the country in question for an uninterrupted period of at least 5 years before your 18th birthday

  • You must present your naturalisation certificate issued by the country where you live.
  • You must present proof of residence, for example an electricity bill.
  • You must present proof that you cancelled your registration as a resident of a Dutch municipality.
  • You must present 1 or more of the following documents:
    • original school reports from 5 consecutive years and a statement from the school confirming that you were a student there
    • immigration documents, for example old residence permits or visas
    • an overview of your parents’ taxes showing that you were dependent on your parents
    • other documents that prove you lived in the country whose nationality your acquired for at least 5 years before your 18th birthday.

You acquired the nationality that your partner possesses

  • You must present your naturalisation certificate issued by the country where you live.
  • You must present proof of residence, for example an electricity bill.
  • You must present a legalised official copy of your marriage certificate or certificate of registered partnership. The official copy must have been issued after you were naturalised.
  • You must present the following documents concerning your partner:
    • a photocopy of their identity document stating their nationality at the time you acquired that nationality or, if their identity document is not available, their naturalisation certificate
    • an extract of the marriage or divorce certificate or the certificate of registered partnership.